Monthly Archives: November 2016

West Highlands project wins a 2016 European Broadband Award

The European Commission has recognised five of the best broadband projects in Europe in the European Broadband Awards.

Broadband Europe promotes the European Commission’s vision to turn Europe into a Gigabit Society by 2025.

The UK RemIX project to bring high speed internet to rural areas on the West Coast of Scotland won the prize in the ‘Future-proof and quality of service’ category.  The other winning projects were from Italy, the Netherlands, Austria and Poland.

Hear more about RemIX in this short video clip.

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SPICe blog: UK decision to leave the European Union hub

Theresa May Visits Scotland

© Crown Copyright. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) produces research briefings on a wide range of issues. Intended to assist MSPs in their parliamentary work by providing relevant up-to-date impartial background material the briefing papers are useful to anyone starting to research a current issue.

SPICe also produce a blog which has a section devoted to the UK decision to leave the European Union. A particularly useful feature is the weekly update on current developments following on from the decision to leave.

 

Next year’s Charlemagne Youth Prize competition launched

2016-charlemagne-youth-prize-winners

The Charlemagne Youth Prize is an annual competition organised by the European Parliament and the International Charlemagne Prize of Aachen. It is an opportunity for people aged 16-30 across Europe to develop projects with the aim of encouraging understanding between people from different European countries.

Former winning projects include:

1 InteGREAT (Italy)

Project created by AIESEC that aims to encourage young people from all over Europe to help integrate refugees. The project organises workshops, leisure activities, seminars and others events and involves international volunteers, local non-governmental organisations and local communities.

2 Searching for a Charlemagne (Greece)

Project by students from a lyceum in Pyrgetos, Greece, who came up with a tablet game about Carolus Magnus (742-814 AD), Better known as Charlemagne, the creator of Frankish Empire was called the Father of Europe at the time for his attempts to create a union.

3 Young European Council (UK)

The Young European Council is an international annual conference which brings together young people passionate about the future of the European Union. The aim is to provide input to European policy making. Last year’s conference took place on 15-19 November in Brussels and included three panels dedicated to the topics migration and home affairs, energy union and climate action: and education to employment.

(Information on winning entries taken from here)

There are cash prizes as well as the opportunity for winning project representatives to visit the European parliament in Brussels or Strasbourg.

All the information you need to apply can be found here.

Statistics 4 beginners

Do you need statistical information for your assignments but find the information difficult to understand?  Well  Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union, does not only produce material for confident, skilled users.  There is a section called Statistics Explained  presenting articles on statistical topics in an easily understandable way.  In addition you can go to one of the workbooks in Statistics 4 beginners for help.

Eurostat publishes freely available harmonised statistics on the EU.  Data is collected from national statistical authorities using standardised methodologies enabling genuine comparisons to be made between countries or regions.

The University of Aberdeen is recognised as a ‘research entity’ by Eurostat. This allows researchers at the University of Aberdeen to request access to microdata , the units of data that aggregate statistics are compiled from, by submitting research proposals to Eurostat.

DG Communication’s latest Publications Newsletter out now

p-u-nov-16The European Commission’s DG Communication department put together a monthly Publications Update so you can stay on top of the latest publications from the Citizen’s Information Unit. The November issue is out now and available here.

Some examples of publications highlighted in this issue are:

These and more are available online and in the Taylor Library‘s EC collection (just ask in the EDC!)

Reminder of tonight’s guest lecture on the legal questions posed by Brexit

EU textured Flag
© Nicolas Raymond. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Just a reminder that Dr. Holger Hestermeyer (Kings College London) will be giving his lecture How will Brexit Happen? Legal Questions Faced by the UK this evening at 6pm in New Kings (NK1)

Abstract:

In a referendum held in the UK on 23 June 2016, 51.9% of the participating electorate voted to leave the European Union. The number of legal questions raised by the referendum are breathtaking. This presentation tackles three of them: First, it discusses questions of UK constitutional law involved in deciding to leave the Union, namely the role of referenda, sovereignty of Parliament, the scope of the royal prerogative and devolution. Second, the basic EU law rules concerning the withdrawal process as contained in Art. 50 of the TEU will be presented. These involve issues such as the start of the negotiations, their content, length, how they will be conducted and whether the UK can conclude trade agreements during the Art. 50 negotiations process. Finally, the “fallback” option – the status of the UK in the WTO will be covered.

The Brexit Case: The Reasoning, Implications and Potential Consequences of the High Court’s Judgment

Another interesting article from the Law School on the High Court’s Judgement in ‘the Brexit case’. This one by Dr. Robert Brett Taylor, is an expanded version of a piece that appeared in last Friday’s Press and Journal (04/11/16).

Aberdeenunilaw

This post is by Dr Robert Brett Taylor. It is an expanded version of his note that appeared in the Press & Journal on Friday 4 November 2016.

Following the decision of 52% of the UK electorate to exit the European Union (EU) on 23 June 2016, Prime Minister Theresa May has been steadfast in her belief that the power to initiate the UK’s exit from the EU lay with the Government under the ‘royal prerogative’ and not with Parliament. On Thursday 3 November 2016, however, the High Court of Justice in England gave its highly anticipated judgment in the Brexit Case (R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union [2016] EWHC 2768 (Admin)), ruling that the UK Government must seek parliamentary approval before exiting the EU. This blog post will briefly outline the reasoning of the High Court in reaching its decision, as…

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