Category Archives: Aberdeen Law School

Seminar on Investment Arbitration in the EU

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The School of Law is hosting a seminar called Investment Arbitration in the EU? A song from the past or a new beat. Presented by Dr Gloria Alvarez it takes place in C11 Taylor Building on 1st November between 2-3pm.  Further information is available here.

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‘Reflections on Terrorism in the UK’ – upcoming panel discussion event

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The European Law Students’ Association (ELSA) Aberdeen will host a panel discussion event tomorrow (26/10/17) on the topic of ‘Terrorism in the UK’. The event will be held in New Kings (NK6) at 7pm and entrance is free. for more information and to note your interest, visit the ELSA Aberdeen Facebook page.

Seminar -Federalism by Conventions: The Constitutional Implications of Brexit on the Union

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© [Ross Strachan]. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The School of Law will host a free public lecture by Dr Robert Taylor on the 10th of February entitled Federalism by Conventions: The Constitutional Implications of Brexit on the Union.  See the abstract below for details:

On 23rd June 2016, a majority of the British electorate decided to leave the European Union against all expectations, and the constitutional impact of this historic decision, particularly on the Union, remains shrouded in uncertainty. Despite being a UK-wide referendum, the Union was left very much divided following the result. Although the majority of England and Wales chose to leave the EU, both Northern Ireland and Scotland chose decisively to remain. Two nations thus risk being dragged out of the EU against their wishes, thereby bringing into question not only the desirability of the UK’s constitutional arrangements, but the continued existence of the UK itself. Some have suggested that the only viable solution post-Brexit is for a federal UK where each nation is given greater autonomy over its own affairs – including perhaps EU membership – which is enshrined in law via a new codified and entrenched constitution. Such a move would constitute a major shift in the direction of the constitution which, it is argued, may bring as much uncertainty as the referendum result itself. I thus wish to explore alternative options, in particular the role constitutional conventions may have to play in creating and regulating a federal UK.

The event will be held in New Kings, NK 11 from 16.00-17.30.  No booking is required.

If you have any questions about the event please contact:
Suzi Warren
Research, Commercial and Events Secretary
Tel: +44 (0) 1224 273421
Email: smjwarren@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

Reminder of tonight’s guest lecture on the legal questions posed by Brexit

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© Nicolas Raymond. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Just a reminder that Dr. Holger Hestermeyer (Kings College London) will be giving his lecture How will Brexit Happen? Legal Questions Faced by the UK this evening at 6pm in New Kings (NK1)

Abstract:

In a referendum held in the UK on 23 June 2016, 51.9% of the participating electorate voted to leave the European Union. The number of legal questions raised by the referendum are breathtaking. This presentation tackles three of them: First, it discusses questions of UK constitutional law involved in deciding to leave the Union, namely the role of referenda, sovereignty of Parliament, the scope of the royal prerogative and devolution. Second, the basic EU law rules concerning the withdrawal process as contained in Art. 50 of the TEU will be presented. These involve issues such as the start of the negotiations, their content, length, how they will be conducted and whether the UK can conclude trade agreements during the Art. 50 negotiations process. Finally, the “fallback” option – the status of the UK in the WTO will be covered.

Yeah but, no but: why the High Court was right and wrong in the Brexit case

Article by the Law School’s Dr. Justin Borg-Barthet on the recent ‘Brexit Case’

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This blog post is by Dr. Justin Borg-Barthet.

The High Court decision in Miller (the ‘Brexit case’) was essentially a public law case.  The judgment (PDF) addresses the question of whether the royal prerogative can be exercised to repeal vested statutory rights.  As is well known, the Court found in the negative.  In the Court’s view, therefore, notice of the UK’s intention to withdraw from the European Union requires parliamentary consent.

But the judgment turns on a question of EU law, namely whether revocation of notice of intention to withdraw from the EU is possible.  Here too the Court found in the negative.  Both the claimants and government were of the view that once notice is given under Article 50 TEU, that notice is irrevocable.  In other words, once the UK notifies the European Council that it wishes to withdraw, the UK cannot change its mind and…

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Free guest lecture on the legal questions posed by Brexit

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© Nicolas Raymond. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

On Tuesday 8th November the School of Law will host a free public lecture by Dr. Holger Hestermeyer of Kings College London. The title of the talk is How will Brexit Happen? Legal Questions Faced by the UK. See the abstract below for details:

In a referendum held in the UK on 23 June 2016, 51.9% of the participating electorate voted to leave the European Union. The number of legal questions raised by the referendum are breathtaking. This presentation tackles three of them: First, it discusses questions of UK constitutional law involved in deciding to leave the Union, namely the role of referenda, sovereignty of Parliament, the scope of the royal prerogative and devolution. Second, the basic EU law rules concerning the withdrawal process as contained in Art. 50 of the TEU will be presented. These involve issues such as the start of the negotiations, their content, length, how they will be conducted and whether the UK can conclude trade agreements during the Art. 50 negotiations process. Finally, the “fallback” option – the status of the UK in the WTO will be covered.

The event will be held in New Kings (NK1), 6pm-8pm. Booking is not required.

If you have any questions about the event please contact:
Suzi Warren
Research, Commercial and Events Secretary
Tel: +44 (0) 1224 273421
Email: smjwarren@abdn.ac.uk

 

Guest Lecture on Scotland’s Options for Brexit

 

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© MPD01605. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

A free public lecture on Scotland’s options for Brexit, hosted by the School of Law,  will take place at the University’s Regent Lecture Theatre  from 6pm to 8pm this evening.  Admission is free and there is no need to book.

The lecture will be given by Professor Sir David Edward who is a member of the Standing Council on Europe set up by the First Minister following the result of the Referendum vote for the UK to leave the European Union.  Further information is available here.

 

 

 

Law School Blog Articles on Brexit

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Staff in the University of Aberdeen Law School have produced a couple of blog posts discussing some of the wider implications of Brexit. See below for links.

Jonathan Fitchen has written a piece entitled Brexit and EU private international law: cross-border judgments – unintended consequences

and Scott Styles has written What is sufficient to constitute an Article 50 decision to leave the EU?

There are many more interesting articles on this blog so do check it out.