Category Archives: EU Law

Eur-Lex Newsletter

eurlexThe latest edition of the EUR-Lex newsletter is now available.  The August edition highlights some improvements made to the site e.g. legislation results lists now include ‘No longer in force’ and ‘Not yet in force’, in addition to ‘In force’, clarifying the legal status of the documents concerned.  They are colour-coded: green – in force; yellow – not yet in force and red – no longer in force.

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The abolition of mobile roaming charges and Brexit

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© Garry Knight. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Since 15 June 2017 roaming charges in the EU have been abolished allowing mobile customers to use their network provider’s allowance of minutes, text messages and data throughout the EU and the European Economic Area (EEA) without incurring additional charges.

The abolition of roaming charges will continue to apply in the UK until it leaves the EU.

A new House of Commons Library briefing paper, available here, looks at possible scenarios after Brexit.

The factsheets below, produced by the European Commission, explain the current pre-Brexit situation.

Roaming factsheet: TechnicalroamingfactsheetEN

Roam Like at Home FAQs: RoamLikeatHomeEN

However, as this BBC article explains, customers are still liable for extra charges if they exceed their contractually agreed data usage limits.

 

 

 

Brexit: Agriculture and trade

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©B4bees. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The outcome of Brexit negotiations will impact on agriculture and trade in agricultural products across the UK.

A House of Commons Library paper looking at the issues is available here.

An earlier briefing paper by the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) looking at these issues in Scotland is available here.

 

Brexit and the fishing industry

Peterhead Harbour
© Stu Smith . Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The implications of Brexit for the fishing industry are highly uncertain.  Prior to the introduction of a new Fisheries Bill, the House of Commons Library has produced a briefing paper entitled “Brexit: What next for UK fisheries?” on how negotiations with the EU and future UK Government policy may affect fishing in the UK.  It is available here.

An earlier briefing paper by the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) called Implications of leaving the EU: Fisheries examines issues for the Scottish sea fishing sector.  It is available here.

Data Roaming Charges Abolished in the EU

Roaming factsheet detail
Factsheet detail © European Commission

As of today, (15th June 2017) data roaming charges for all travellers in the European Union have been abolished, as part of the wider project to create a Digital Single Market. The European Commission has produced a couple of useful factsheets (see links at bottom of article) on what this entails. However, as this BBC article explains, customers are still liable for extra charges if they exceed their contractually agreed data usage limits.

As the BBC article also points out, once article 50 has been fully implemented, it will be the up to a future UK Government to decide as to whether the UK adopts these pricing restrictions or not.

Roaming factsheet: TechnicalroamingfactsheetEN

Roam Like at Home FAQs: RoamLikeatHomeEN

 

European Investigation Order

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©MPDO1605. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The European Investigation Order in criminal matters which came in to force on the 22nd of May will simplify the work of judicial authorities when they request evidence located in another EU country. This new system allows EU countries to obtain evidence in other EU countries, for criminal cases that involve more than one country.

“Criminals and terrorists know no borders. Equipping judicial authorities with the European Investigation Order will help them cooperate effectively to fight organised crime, terrorism, drug trafficking and corruption. It will give judicial authorities access to evidence quickly wherever it is in the EU. I call on all Member States to implement it as quickly as possible to improve our common fight against crime and terrorism. In June we will also discuss with Member States solutions to facilitate the collection and exchange of e-evidence. It is time to fully modernise the tools available to judicial authorities to conduct investigations.”

More information is available here

 

Justice for families, individuals and businesses

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© Gerard Van der Leun. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

A report by the EU Justice Sub-Committee of the House of Lords looks at the issues arising from the UK’s decision to leave the European Union, and, in particular, remove itself from the jurisdiction of the Court of Justice of the European Union, in relation to European cross border cases in such areas as:

  • Divorce
  • Disputed custody of children
  • A medical negligence claim;
  • Litigation arising out of a car accident abroad
  • Failure to perform a contract
  • An employment dispute

The current legal framework provides certainty about where such cases should be held and  for the automatic recognition and enforcement of judicial decisions and judgments throughout the EU. The report highlights concerns for families, individuals and businesses if  alternative adequate arrangements are not in place when the UK leaves the EU.

The full report is available here:

 

 

Brexit reading list: legal and constitutional issues

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©parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament

 

The House of Commons Library has compiled an impartial selection of articles on the legal and constitutional issues arising from the UK’s forthcoming withdrawal from the EU.

The paper gives details of and, in many cases, links to analysis and comment on:

  • The EU referendum
  • constitutional and legal issues surrounding UK withdrawal
  • the triggering of Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union
  • the role of the UK Parliament in triggering the process and in the negotiations
  • the possibility of a second referendum on a withdrawal agreement
  • how the UK Government and Parliament deal with EU legislation
  • the impact of Brexit on the rest of the EU
  • the UK’s future relations with the EU
  • issues for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The paper can be accessed from here: