Category Archives: EU Law

Package travel: better protection for holidaymakers

Going on holiday soon?  Did you know that from the 1st of July holidaymakers benefit from additional rights and better protection under updated EU package travel rules when booking travel packages where you choose different elements – such as flight, hotel, car hire – from a single point of sale online or offline. The new rules also cover linked travel arrangements when you book travel services at one point of sale, but using separate booking processes, or, book one travel service on one website, then another service that you are invited to book on a different website.

To find out more about these, and other additions rights contained in the new law, have a look at the factsheet or watch the video below.

Under the terms of the proposed transition period after the UK leaves the EU at the end of March 2019, this Directive will be applicable in the UK until the end of 2020. It’s continued application after that will depend on the outcome of negotiations on the future EU-UK relationship and/or UK policy.

 

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Take control of your data

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) enters into force today and updates data protections principles established 20 years ago. The GDPR reinforces the rules by which all organisations and companies  providing services in the EU must abide. The GDPR gives us better ways to say what our data can be used for, to retract our consent, to transfer our data or to ask for it to be erased so we can now shop, share and surf with more confidence online.

To find out more, read: Its your data- take control: a citizen’s guide to data protection in the EU here.  Or watch this video from the UK’s Channel 4 News.

Brexit negotiations: transition period

European Commission
© Andrew Gustar. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The Draft Agreement on the withdrawal of the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland from the European Union and Euratom is available in a coloured coded version, highlighting both where progress has been made and areas still to be agreed.

If you are following the withdrawl process you can find other relevant documents here.

Publications from the UK Department for Exiting the European Union are available here.

Help using EUR-Lex

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Detail from EUR-Lex website © European Commission

EUR-Lex is the official database for accessing EU law.  Free to use, it is available in 24 languages and includes treaties, legislation, international agreements, preparatory acts, case law and parliamentary questions. It gives direct access to the Official Journal of the European Union.

An e-learning module is available to help you use and get the most out of EUR-Lex.

The module, which takes two hours to complete, can be done as a whole or you can select only the sections that are relevant to you. The module looks at:

  • finding EU law through ‘Quick search’, ‘Advanced search’ and ‘Find results by’ search options on the EUR-Lex homepage
  • discovering ways to edit and refine your searches
  • accessing documents in multiple languages, and finding legal information about documents and legislative procedures
  • accessing the Official Journal, preparatory acts and EU case-law
  • understanding EUR-Lex’s content and structure, including how to form CELEX numbers
  • browsing EU law through the directories of legislation and EuroVoc
  • pointing out the advantages of being a EUR-Lex registered user.

Still having difficulty with EUR-Lex come and see us in the Taylor Library.

 

 

The Scottish Parliament and Brexit

Scottish Parliament (2)
© dun-deagh. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Earlier this month the Scottish Parliament’s Finance and Constitution Committee stated it could not recommend legislative consent to the UK Government’s European Union Withdrawal Bill in its present form. The Committee believes clause 11 of the Bill is incompatible with the devolution settlement.  Their interim report is available here.  A final report will be produced on the Bill prior to the final amending stage in the House of Lords.

The Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe), which provides impartial, factual, information and analysis to Members of the Scottish Parliament, has produced a briefing paper explaining what legislative consent is and its legal and political status.

The Scottish Government has indicated it may introduce its own EU Continuity Bill to prepare Scotland’s laws for Brexit. A guest post on the SPICe spotlight blog, by Professor Sionaidh Douglas-Scott, discussing this possibility is available here.  Guest blog posts, of course, reflect the views of the author not SPICe or the Scottish Parliament.

 

 

 

 

Eur-Lex Newsletter

eurlexThe latest edition of the EUR-Lex newsletter is now available.  The August edition highlights some improvements made to the site e.g. legislation results lists now include ‘No longer in force’ and ‘Not yet in force’, in addition to ‘In force’, clarifying the legal status of the documents concerned.  They are colour-coded: green – in force; yellow – not yet in force and red – no longer in force.

To keep up-to-date with changes to EUR-Lex you can subscribe to the newsletter. In addition short video tutorials for EUR-Lex are available here.  We have also produced our own short guide.

 

The abolition of mobile roaming charges and Brexit

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© Garry Knight. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Since 15 June 2017 roaming charges in the EU have been abolished allowing mobile customers to use their network provider’s allowance of minutes, text messages and data throughout the EU and the European Economic Area (EEA) without incurring additional charges.

The abolition of roaming charges will continue to apply in the UK until it leaves the EU.

A new House of Commons Library briefing paper, available here, looks at possible scenarios after Brexit.

The factsheets below, produced by the European Commission, explain the current pre-Brexit situation.

Roaming factsheet: TechnicalroamingfactsheetEN

Roam Like at Home FAQs: RoamLikeatHomeEN

However, as this BBC article explains, customers are still liable for extra charges if they exceed their contractually agreed data usage limits.

 

 

 

Brexit: Agriculture and trade

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
©B4bees. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The outcome of Brexit negotiations will impact on agriculture and trade in agricultural products across the UK.

A House of Commons Library paper looking at the issues is available here.

An earlier briefing paper by the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) looking at these issues in Scotland is available here.

 

Brexit and the fishing industry

Peterhead Harbour
© Stu Smith . Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The implications of Brexit for the fishing industry are highly uncertain.  Prior to the introduction of a new Fisheries Bill, the House of Commons Library has produced a briefing paper entitled “Brexit: What next for UK fisheries?” on how negotiations with the EU and future UK Government policy may affect fishing in the UK.  It is available here.

An earlier briefing paper by the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) called Implications of leaving the EU: Fisheries examines issues for the Scottish sea fishing sector.  It is available here.

Data Roaming Charges Abolished in the EU

Roaming factsheet detail
Factsheet detail © European Commission

As of today, (15th June 2017) data roaming charges for all travellers in the European Union have been abolished, as part of the wider project to create a Digital Single Market. The European Commission has produced a couple of useful factsheets (see links at bottom of article) on what this entails. However, as this BBC article explains, customers are still liable for extra charges if they exceed their contractually agreed data usage limits.

As the BBC article also points out, once article 50 has been fully implemented, it will be the up to a future UK Government to decide as to whether the UK adopts these pricing restrictions or not.

Roaming factsheet: TechnicalroamingfactsheetEN

Roam Like at Home FAQs: RoamLikeatHomeEN