Category Archives: EU Referendum

EU Referendum campaign leaflets collection available online

yesno
© Quinn Dombrowski. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The British Library and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) Library have collected a sample of leaflets from organisations, political parties and individuals both from the “Leave” and the “Remain” side in last June’s Referendum. The collection also includes material collected by National Library of Wales.  You can view this revealing collection, via the LSE Digital Library, here.  The digital library also has leaflets from the 1975 Referendum allowing you to compare the two campaigns.

 

Brexit reading list: legal and constitutional issues

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©parliamentary copyright images are reproduced with the permission of Parliament

 

The House of Commons Library has compiled an impartial selection of articles on the legal and constitutional issues arising from the UK’s forthcoming withdrawal from the EU.

The paper gives details of and, in many cases, links to analysis and comment on:

  • The EU referendum
  • constitutional and legal issues surrounding UK withdrawal
  • the triggering of Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union
  • the role of the UK Parliament in triggering the process and in the negotiations
  • the possibility of a second referendum on a withdrawal agreement
  • how the UK Government and Parliament deal with EU legislation
  • the impact of Brexit on the rest of the EU
  • the UK’s future relations with the EU
  • issues for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The paper can be accessed from here:

Scotland’s Place in Europe – paper published today

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First Minister’s Christmas card 2016 featuring Oor Wullie!

The Scottish Government has published a paper detailing “proposals to keep Scotland in the European Single Market, retain freedom of movement, and to equip the Scottish Parliament with the powers it needs to serve Scotland’s interests post-Brexit” as explained on the Scottish Government website. You can read the full paper in html or pdf formats by following the appropriate links on this page . There is a link to the pdf at the end of this post.

 

Scotland’s Place in Europe pdf version.

SPICe blog: UK decision to leave the European Union hub

Theresa May Visits Scotland

© Crown Copyright. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) produces research briefings on a wide range of issues. Intended to assist MSPs in their parliamentary work by providing relevant up-to-date impartial background material the briefing papers are useful to anyone starting to research a current issue.

SPICe also produce a blog which has a section devoted to the UK decision to leave the European Union. A particularly useful feature is the weekly update on current developments following on from the decision to leave.

 

Reminder of tonight’s guest lecture on the legal questions posed by Brexit

EU textured Flag
© Nicolas Raymond. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Just a reminder that Dr. Holger Hestermeyer (Kings College London) will be giving his lecture How will Brexit Happen? Legal Questions Faced by the UK this evening at 6pm in New Kings (NK1)

Abstract:

In a referendum held in the UK on 23 June 2016, 51.9% of the participating electorate voted to leave the European Union. The number of legal questions raised by the referendum are breathtaking. This presentation tackles three of them: First, it discusses questions of UK constitutional law involved in deciding to leave the Union, namely the role of referenda, sovereignty of Parliament, the scope of the royal prerogative and devolution. Second, the basic EU law rules concerning the withdrawal process as contained in Art. 50 of the TEU will be presented. These involve issues such as the start of the negotiations, their content, length, how they will be conducted and whether the UK can conclude trade agreements during the Art. 50 negotiations process. Finally, the “fallback” option – the status of the UK in the WTO will be covered.

The Brexit Case: The Reasoning, Implications and Potential Consequences of the High Court’s Judgment

Another interesting article from the Law School on the High Court’s Judgement in ‘the Brexit case’. This one by Dr. Robert Brett Taylor, is an expanded version of a piece that appeared in last Friday’s Press and Journal (04/11/16).

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This post is by Dr Robert Brett Taylor. It is an expanded version of his note that appeared in the Press & Journal on Friday 4 November 2016.

Following the decision of 52% of the UK electorate to exit the European Union (EU) on 23 June 2016, Prime Minister Theresa May has been steadfast in her belief that the power to initiate the UK’s exit from the EU lay with the Government under the ‘royal prerogative’ and not with Parliament. On Thursday 3 November 2016, however, the High Court of Justice in England gave its highly anticipated judgment in the Brexit Case (R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union [2016] EWHC 2768 (Admin)), ruling that the UK Government must seek parliamentary approval before exiting the EU. This blog post will briefly outline the reasoning of the High Court in reaching its decision, as…

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Yeah but, no but: why the High Court was right and wrong in the Brexit case

Article by the Law School’s Dr. Justin Borg-Barthet on the recent ‘Brexit Case’

Aberdeenunilaw

This blog post is by Dr. Justin Borg-Barthet.

The High Court decision in Miller (the ‘Brexit case’) was essentially a public law case.  The judgment (PDF) addresses the question of whether the royal prerogative can be exercised to repeal vested statutory rights.  As is well known, the Court found in the negative.  In the Court’s view, therefore, notice of the UK’s intention to withdraw from the European Union requires parliamentary consent.

But the judgment turns on a question of EU law, namely whether revocation of notice of intention to withdraw from the EU is possible.  Here too the Court found in the negative.  Both the claimants and government were of the view that once notice is given under Article 50 TEU, that notice is irrevocable.  In other words, once the UK notifies the European Council that it wishes to withdraw, the UK cannot change its mind and…

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Free guest lecture on the legal questions posed by Brexit

EU textured Flag
© Nicolas Raymond. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

On Tuesday 8th November the School of Law will host a free public lecture by Dr. Holger Hestermeyer of Kings College London. The title of the talk is How will Brexit Happen? Legal Questions Faced by the UK. See the abstract below for details:

In a referendum held in the UK on 23 June 2016, 51.9% of the participating electorate voted to leave the European Union. The number of legal questions raised by the referendum are breathtaking. This presentation tackles three of them: First, it discusses questions of UK constitutional law involved in deciding to leave the Union, namely the role of referenda, sovereignty of Parliament, the scope of the royal prerogative and devolution. Second, the basic EU law rules concerning the withdrawal process as contained in Art. 50 of the TEU will be presented. These involve issues such as the start of the negotiations, their content, length, how they will be conducted and whether the UK can conclude trade agreements during the Art. 50 negotiations process. Finally, the “fallback” option – the status of the UK in the WTO will be covered.

The event will be held in New Kings (NK1), 6pm-8pm. Booking is not required.

If you have any questions about the event please contact:
Suzi Warren
Research, Commercial and Events Secretary
Tel: +44 (0) 1224 273421
Email: smjwarren@abdn.ac.uk

 

Two upcoming Brexit discussion events Hosted by the University of Aberdeen

 ‘Still Home Abroad After Brexit?‘ and ‘Brexit and the Commonwealth: Historical reflections‘ will both take place on Monday the 7th November, the former in New Kings on Campus and the latter in the Satrosphere Science Centre near the beach. See below* for full details of each. Both events are free but booking is recommended.

Brexit and the Commonwealth: Historical reflections

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07 November 2016, 17:30 – 18:30

Speaker: Andrew Dilley

A probe into the past to highlight options for the UK in the future.

Since the UK voted to leave the EU, many look to the Commonwealth for alternative trading outlets. But is this a realistic option? This event puts this crucial question in historical perspective. It will look at Commonwealth trade down to Britain’s entry into the European Economic Community in 1973 and offer the audience a chance to probe the past and consider whether these old relationships offer a path to the future.

Admission is FREE, booking is required.

Hosted by: University of Aberdeen

Venue: New King’s 3, Kings College

Booking: Online booking available

Contact:

For more information please click HERE. Or call 01224 273689.

Still Home Abroad After Brexit?

Still Home
07 November 2016, 19:00 – 21:00

Speaker: Karin Friederich

An insight into issues faced by EU citizens in the UK.

Integration of Poles into Scottish society has been a success story. EU citizens in Scotland received letters from their pro-EU MPs assuring them that their status in Scotland is safe after Brexit, yet their future will be negotiated by Westminster. How do communities react to such uncertainty? Academics and practitioners offer their insights in a public discussion of the main issues that Polish citizens face after the referendum.

Admission is FREE, booking is required. 

Hosted by: University of Aberdeen

Venue: Aberdeen Science Centre

Booking: Online booking available

Contact:

For more information please click HERE, or call 01224 273689.

*Information taken from the University of Aberdeen’s events page.

 

Brexit reading list: legal and constitutional issues

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© Maurice. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The House of Commons Library has published an impartial list of publications on the legal and constitutional issues surrounding the UK withdrawal from the European Union including:

  • Triggering of Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU)
  • Role of the UK Parliament
  • Possibility of a second referendum on a withdrawal agreement
  • How the UK Government and Parliament deal with EU legislation
  • Impact of Brexit on the rest of the EU
  • UK’s future relations with the EU
  • Issues for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

This publication will be updated periodically.

The Libraries of the House of Commons, House of Lords and the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST) produce research briefings on a wide range of current issues. They are intended to aid the work of members of both Houses of Parliament by providing good quality impartial background material on current issues. This makes them extremely useful to anyone starting to research a current topic. They can be searched by date or topic here.