Category Archives: European Parliament

Help using EUR-Lex

Banner-EURLex-E-learning-150X150
Detail from EUR-Lex website © European Commission

EUR-Lex is the official database for accessing EU law.  Free to use, it is available in 24 languages and includes treaties, legislation, international agreements, preparatory acts, case law and parliamentary questions. It gives direct access to the Official Journal of the European Union.

An e-learning module is available to help you use and get the most out of EUR-Lex.

The module, which takes two hours to complete, can be done as a whole or you can select only the sections that are relevant to you. The module looks at:

  • finding EU law through ‘Quick search’, ‘Advanced search’ and ‘Find results by’ search options on the EUR-Lex homepage
  • discovering ways to edit and refine your searches
  • accessing documents in multiple languages, and finding legal information about documents and legislative procedures
  • accessing the Official Journal, preparatory acts and EU case-law
  • understanding EUR-Lex’s content and structure, including how to form CELEX numbers
  • browsing EU law through the directories of legislation and EuroVoc
  • pointing out the advantages of being a EUR-Lex registered user.

Still having difficulty with EUR-Lex come and see us in the Taylor Library.

 

 

Advertisements

Brexit and Ireland

EUBOOK

Interested in how Brexit will impact Ireland?  Then some recent publications available through the EU Bookshop maybe of interest.

UK withdrawal (“Brexit”) and the Good Friday Agreement

Brexit and Ireland: Legal political and economic considerations

The impact and consequences of Brexit on Northern Ireland

The EU Bookshop is an online bookshop, library and archive of publications from the EU institutions and agencies going back to 1952 and includes work produced jointly with partner institutions.  Most publications can be downloaded in pdf format free of charge.

Aberdeen University users can also find EU Bookshop material using the ‘All Collections’ tab in Primo.  Any EU Bookshop items that appear in your search results can be accessed by clicking the title, which will take you straight through to the Bookshop itself, where you can download a pdf of your document.

State of the Union Address 2017

Every September the President of the European Commission President gives his State of the Union Address to the European Parliament.

On Wednesday Jean-Claude Juncker delivered the State of the Union Address for 2017 and took stock of the achievements of the past year,  presented his priorities for the coming year and outlined his vision of how the EU might evolve by 2025.

The text of his speech is available here.

Other useful documents include:

The Roadmap for a more unite, stronger and more democratic Union.

Factsheets on the topics covered in the State of the Union address:

 

New EU Parliament video: Combatting planned obsolescence

obsolescenceIt is a sad fact that many technological items are manufactured to have deliberately limited life spans in order to force consumers to replace products more regularly. To combat this, the European Parliament wants to set minimum resistance criteria for products so that consumers can have a better idea of how durable the item is. If products are built with better quality components that aren’t completely sealed in they will last longer and be more easily repairable. Over three-quarters of EU consumers would prefer to fix broken products than buy new ones, so the will is there. Have a look at this EuroparlTV video to find out more about the issue.

 

European Year of Cultural Heritage

SB
©Martin Deutsch. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

2018 is to be designated the European Year of Cultural Heritage. Find out more here or have a look at the video below.

“Our cultural heritage is more than the memory of our past; it is the key to our future. A European Year of Cultural Heritage will be an opportunity to raise awareness of the social and economic importance of cultural heritage and to promote European excellence in the sector.”

Scotland and Brexit

distillery
© Jack Shainsky. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Two recent reports may be of interest:

A research paper entitled The Impact of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union on Scotland, Wales and Gibraltar  has been produced at the request of the European Parliament’s Committee on Constitutional Affairs.  It looks at the economic and political implications of Brexit  and at the possible return of  ‘Europeanised’ competencies to  devolved administrations. The paper also considers how Brexit might affect their future relationships within the UK and externally with the EU.

The Scottish Parliament’s SPICe briefing paper: The White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill – Impact on Scotland  looks at how the provisions proposed in the UK Government White Paper  “Legislating for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union” may affect Scotland.

As regular readers will know, SPICe also provides a weekly update on the current developments on the United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union.  The latest bulletin is available here.

 

 

Fake news and how to spot it

Godzilla fakenews

© AV Dezign Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Completely fabricated news stories with the deliberate aim of misleading people has become an increasingly common phenomenon on social media making it difficult sometimes to know if what you are reading is fake news.

The European Parliament Research Bureau has produced an infographic called “Five steps to spot fake news” giving tips to help you decide for yourself whether you can trust in the veracity of what you are reading.  The full briefing is available here.

UPDATE: Phasing-out roaming charges within EU

no roaming
© European commission. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Mobile roaming charges in the EU are set to end completely by mid-June 2017, and as of 30th April 2016 year rates were capped at a reduced rate as part of the phase-out process.

As the last step towards the end of roaming charges by 15 June 2017, representatives of the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission have agreed on how to set the prices operators charge each other when their customers use other networks when roaming in the EU.

The EU negotiators agreed on the following wholesale caps:

  • 3.2 cents per minute of voice call, as of 15 June 2017
  • 1 cent per SMS, as of 15 June 2017

They also agreed to a step-by-step reduction over five years for data caps, decreasing from €7.70 per GB (as of 15 June 2017) to €6 per GB (as of 1 January 2018), €4.50 per GB (as of 1 January 2019), €3.50 per GB (as of 1 January 2020), €3 per GB (as of 1 January 2021) and €2.50 per GB (as of 1 January 2022). The agreement is the final step to making “roam-like-at-home” work as of 15 June 2017, as foreseen in the Telecom Single Market (TSM) Regulation. It means that when travelling in the EU, consumers will be able to call, send SMS or surf on their mobile at the same price they pay at home. More information is available on the Commission’s Roaming website.

roamingfairusepolicy_17941

Who’s who in the European Parliament bureau

whoswhoepWant to know who’s in charge of  the European Parliament? Here’s a useful infographic with the names of the 14 vice presidents and the 5 quaestors who along with the president make up the bureau’s 20 members:

Following the election of Antonio Tajani as president of the European Parliament, MEPs also selected 14 vice-presidents, who chair debates when the president is not in the chamber and who each have a specific portfolio. In addition, the Parliament has five quaestors, officials responsible for administrative and financial matters. The president, 14 vice-presidents and five quaestors – collectively known as the bureau – are all elected for a period of two-and-a-half years.

Also, if you’d like to know more about what the President of the European Parliament does, have a look at the short explanatory video below: