Category Archives: Northern Ireland

Article 50 Triggered

Article 50 Letter

© Number 10. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The UK Prime Minister, Theresa May, has now triggered Article 50, the formal notification that signals the beginning of the two-year period within which a withdrawal agreement will be negotiated between the UK and the European Union.

The full text of her letter to the President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, is available here.

The latest version of  “Brexit: a reading list of post-EU Referendum publications by Parliament and the Devolved Assemblies” compiled by the House of Commons Library is available here.

Also of interest may be a report commissioned by the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs of the European Parliament’s Directorate-General for Internal Policies of the Union entitled  “The Brexit Negotiations: An Assessment Of The Legal, Political And Institutional Situation In The UK” available here.

Seminar -Federalism by Conventions: The Constitutional Implications of Brexit on the Union

flags-of-the-uk

© [Ross Strachan]. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The School of Law will host a free public lecture by Dr Robert Taylor on the 10th of February entitled Federalism by Conventions: The Constitutional Implications of Brexit on the Union.  See the abstract below for details:

On 23rd June 2016, a majority of the British electorate decided to leave the European Union against all expectations, and the constitutional impact of this historic decision, particularly on the Union, remains shrouded in uncertainty. Despite being a UK-wide referendum, the Union was left very much divided following the result. Although the majority of England and Wales chose to leave the EU, both Northern Ireland and Scotland chose decisively to remain. Two nations thus risk being dragged out of the EU against their wishes, thereby bringing into question not only the desirability of the UK’s constitutional arrangements, but the continued existence of the UK itself. Some have suggested that the only viable solution post-Brexit is for a federal UK where each nation is given greater autonomy over its own affairs – including perhaps EU membership – which is enshrined in law via a new codified and entrenched constitution. Such a move would constitute a major shift in the direction of the constitution which, it is argued, may bring as much uncertainty as the referendum result itself. I thus wish to explore alternative options, in particular the role constitutional conventions may have to play in creating and regulating a federal UK.

The event will be held in New Kings, NK 11 from 16.00-17.30.  No booking is required.

If you have any questions about the event please contact:
Suzi Warren
Research, Commercial and Events Secretary
Tel: +44 (0) 1224 273421
Email: smjwarren@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

What are the implications for the UK and Ireland’s relationship post Brexit?

SONY DSC

© William Murphy  Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

The UK and Ireland have unique historical, economic, cultural and social ties and indeed share a land border.  How will Brexit impact on the Common Travel Area, on trade, on the border, on the peace process and on citizens rights?  In a report published today The House of Lords European Committee looks at all these issues and calls on all parties to the forthcoming Brexit negotiations, to give:

“official recognition to the special, unique nature of UK-Irish relations in their entirety, including the position of Northern Ireland, and the North-South and East-West structure and institutions established under the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement”

Aberdeen University users can access this report as well as other UK Parliament, Scottish Parliament, Northern Ireland Assembly and  the National Assembly for Wales publications on Public Information Online.