Category Archives: UK Parliament

Article 50 negotiations: Implications of ‘no deal’ – Report

Sundown

© Simon & His Camera. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill has now completed its passage through both Houses of Parliament and, under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union, gives the Prime Minister the power to notify the European Council of the UK’s intention to withdraw from the EU.  With Article 50, likely to be triggered by the end of the month, allowing negotiations to start, this report by the Foreign Affairs Committee of the House of Commons looks at what would happen in the event of no deal being reached.

Some of the implications discussed in the report are:

  • Disputes over the cost of exiting the EU
  •  Uncertainty for EU citizens in the UK and UK citizens in the EU
  • Trading on World Trade Organisation terms
  • The ‘regulatory gap’ and the limitations of the Great Repeal Bill
  • Uncertainty for UK participation in the EU’s common foreign and security policy
  • The sudden return of a ‘hard’ customs border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland

The full report is available here

More information about the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill is available here.

 

Advertisements

UK trade options after Brexit

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© John Fielding. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The International Trade Committee‘s first report UK Trade Options Beyond 2019 identifies and examines possible models for  the UK to conduct international trade after it leaves the European Union. It details various options and looks at the issues the Government would need to resolve in each scenario.

Topics considered are:

  • Re-joining EFTA
  • Free Trade Agreement with the EU
  • World Trade Organization rules
  • Free Trade Agreements with the rest of the world
  • Establishing the UK’s position at the WTO

The report summary is available here.

 

 

Brexit reading list

house-of-commons

© [Herry Lawford]. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The House of Commons Library has compiled an impartial selection of articles on the UK’s forthcoming withdrawal from the EU.

The paper gives details of and, in many cases, links to analysis, comment and statistics on:

  • Trade negotiations, tariffs and custom duties
  • Domestic economic policy and public expenditure
  • the EU budget, contributions, grants and loans
  • Business and industry, state aid and SMEs,
  • Employment, training, pay and the cost of living
  • Regional economic development and transport
  • Issues for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland

The paper can be accessed from here.

The United Kingdom’s exit from and new partnership with the European Union White Paper published

houses-of-parliament
© Maurice. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The UK Government has today published a white paper entitled The United Kingdom’s exit from and new partnership with the European Union on its proposed strategy to leave the European Union.  You can read it here.

If you would like to follow The European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill’s progress through Parliament Aberdeen University members can do so on Public Information Online here  or alternatively on the Parliament website here .

There is a handy news section on the House of Commons website to help you keep up-date with what is happening in Parliament here as well as a section on how leaving the EU will affect various policy areas here.

The Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) produces a blog on the UK decision to leave the European Union which is available here.  A particularly useful feature is the weekly update on current developments following on from the decision to leave.

 

UPDATE Can the UK government launch the process to leave the EU without an Act of Parliament?

 

8246446926_b361b9a065_c
© Jay Gavin Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The government’s appeal was dismissed in the Supreme Court yesterday.  This means that Parliament has to give its approval before the formal process of leaving the EU can begin. The judgement and summary documents are available here.

The original case was about prerogative powers, defined by the High Court in the original case as “the residue of legal authority left in the hands of the Crown” however as the UK has a sovereign parliament it is argued that prerogative powers cannot be used to overrule legislation. The government argued, however, that it did have the prerogative power to “make and unmake treaties” allowing it to launch the process without requiring an Act of Parliament.

The Scottish Government was also involved in this case. The Lord Advocate’s intervention proposed that triggering article 50 required an Act of the UK Parliament and as a result also required a Legislative Consent Motion of the Scottish Parliament, under the Sewel Convention, given the effect it would have on matters devolved to the Scottish Parliament.  However, in regards to the Sewel Convention the Supreme Court has ruled that the policing of its scope and the manner of its operation does not lie within the constitutional remit of the judiciary. This means the Scottish Parliament, as with the other devolved administrations, cannot veto the triggering of Article 50.

 

Can the UK government launch the process to leave the EU without an Act of Parliament?

8246446926_b361b9a065_c

© Jay Gavin Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

This is what the Supreme Court will be considering today in a case expected to last 4 days.  Follow it live here.

The case is about prerogative powers, defined by the High Court in the original case as “the residue of legal authority left in the hands of the Crown” however as the UK has a sovereign parliament it is argued that prerogative powers cannot be used to overrule legislation. The government argues, however, in does have the prerogative power to “make and unmake treaties” allowing it to launch the process without requiring an Act of Parliament.

The Scottish Government is also involved in this case. The Lord Advocate’s intervention proposes that triggering article 50 requires an Act of the UK Parliament and as a result requires a Legislative Consent Motion of the Scottish Parliament as matters devolved to them are involved.