Category Archives: Wales

Research briefings on Brexit

House of lords library
© UK Parliament. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The Libraries of the House of Commons and House of Lords and the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST) produce research briefings on a wide range of issues. Intended to aid the work of members of the Houses of Parliament by providing relevant background material they are also useful to anyone starting to research a current topic.

Recent titles on how leaving the EU will affect different policy areas in the UK include:

Importance of trade with the EU for UK industries: Examines the importance of trade with the EU for the sectors and industries of the UK economy.

Employment of other EU nationals in the UK: Provides statistics on nationals of other EU countries working in the UK.

Brexit: the July negotiations: What happened at the second round of Brexit negotiations?

Brexit negotiations: The Irish border question: One of the three main areas of discussion in the first phase of Brexit negotiations.

Some titles that have recently been updated include:

Brexit: a reading list of post-EU Referendum publications by Parliament and the Devolved Assemblies (updated 8 August 2017) briefing and reports from the UK, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The UK’s contribution to the EU budget. (updated 31 July 2017):  how the UK contributes and how much it receives back.

Brexit: the exit bill (updated 31 July 2017): the issues related to the UK’s financial contribution to the EU after Brexit.

Brexit and data protection (updated 27 July 2017): reforms of EU data protection law and what might happen after Brexit.

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Brexit and Devolution

flags-of-the-uk
© Ross Strachan. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The House of Lords European Union Committee has today published a report looking at the technically complex and politically contentious impact of Brexit on the UK’s devolution settlements and to the fundamental constitutional challenges presented to the United Kingdom as a whole.

 “the devolution settlements are built upon UK membership of the EU.

Brexit will remove one of the foundations of the devolution settlements, with potentially destabilising consequences”. (Para. 2)

The report considers whether Scotland could have different Brexit arrangements from the rest of the UK in some areas; the need to protect the Welsh agricultural and manufacturing sector and the distinctive geographical and political issues that Brexit presents to Northern Ireland.

The full report is available here.

 

Scotland and Brexit

distillery
© Jack Shainsky. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Two recent reports may be of interest:

A research paper entitled The Impact of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union on Scotland, Wales and Gibraltar  has been produced at the request of the European Parliament’s Committee on Constitutional Affairs.  It looks at the economic and political implications of Brexit  and at the possible return of  ‘Europeanised’ competencies to  devolved administrations. The paper also considers how Brexit might affect their future relationships within the UK and externally with the EU.

The Scottish Parliament’s SPICe briefing paper: The White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill – Impact on Scotland  looks at how the provisions proposed in the UK Government White Paper  “Legislating for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union” may affect Scotland.

As regular readers will know, SPICe also provides a weekly update on the current developments on the United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union.  The latest bulletin is available here.

 

 

EU Referendum campaign leaflets collection available online

yesno
© Quinn Dombrowski. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The British Library and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) Library have collected a sample of leaflets from organisations, political parties and individuals both from the “Leave” and the “Remain” side in last June’s Referendum. The collection also includes material collected by National Library of Wales.  You can view this revealing collection, via the LSE Digital Library, here.  The digital library also has leaflets from the 1975 Referendum allowing you to compare the two campaigns.

 

Article 50 Triggered

Article 50 Letter

© Number 10. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The UK Prime Minister, Theresa May, has now triggered Article 50, the formal notification that signals the beginning of the two-year period within which a withdrawal agreement will be negotiated between the UK and the European Union.

The full text of her letter to the President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, is available here.

The latest version of  “Brexit: a reading list of post-EU Referendum publications by Parliament and the Devolved Assemblies” compiled by the House of Commons Library is available here.

Also of interest may be a report commissioned by the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs of the European Parliament’s Directorate-General for Internal Policies of the Union entitled  “The Brexit Negotiations: An Assessment Of The Legal, Political And Institutional Situation In The UK” available here.

Seminar -Federalism by Conventions: The Constitutional Implications of Brexit on the Union

flags-of-the-uk

© [Ross Strachan]. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The School of Law will host a free public lecture by Dr Robert Taylor on the 10th of February entitled Federalism by Conventions: The Constitutional Implications of Brexit on the Union.  See the abstract below for details:

On 23rd June 2016, a majority of the British electorate decided to leave the European Union against all expectations, and the constitutional impact of this historic decision, particularly on the Union, remains shrouded in uncertainty. Despite being a UK-wide referendum, the Union was left very much divided following the result. Although the majority of England and Wales chose to leave the EU, both Northern Ireland and Scotland chose decisively to remain. Two nations thus risk being dragged out of the EU against their wishes, thereby bringing into question not only the desirability of the UK’s constitutional arrangements, but the continued existence of the UK itself. Some have suggested that the only viable solution post-Brexit is for a federal UK where each nation is given greater autonomy over its own affairs – including perhaps EU membership – which is enshrined in law via a new codified and entrenched constitution. Such a move would constitute a major shift in the direction of the constitution which, it is argued, may bring as much uncertainty as the referendum result itself. I thus wish to explore alternative options, in particular the role constitutional conventions may have to play in creating and regulating a federal UK.

The event will be held in New Kings, NK 11 from 16.00-17.30.  No booking is required.

If you have any questions about the event please contact:
Suzi Warren
Research, Commercial and Events Secretary
Tel: +44 (0) 1224 273421
Email: smjwarren@abdn.ac.uk