Tag Archives: Brexit implications

International and EU students in higher education in the UK

students
© University of Aberdeen

“In recent years, the UK has been the second most popular global destination for international students after the USA. In 2014 the US took 26% of postgraduate students from all countries who were studying overseas at universities in the OECD, the UK was in second place with 15%. But market share has been slipping and other English speaking countries such as Australia, New Zealand and Canada are now seeing significant increases in overseas students as are European countries which are increasingly offering courses in English”.

A new House of Commons briefing paper answers some frequently asked questions about international and EU students in the UK. It provides lots of statistics and considers the potential impact of both Brexit and the net migration target on international and EU student recruitment.

You can access the report here.

 

Brexit and Professional Sport

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A new briefing paper by the House of Lords Library looks both at the possible impact of migration negotiations on the status of sports professional in the UK and at the potential economic impact of Brexit on football, rugby and cricket.  The full report is available here.

Brexit and Devolution

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© Ross Strachan. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The House of Lords European Union Committee has today published a report looking at the technically complex and politically contentious impact of Brexit on the UK’s devolution settlements and to the fundamental constitutional challenges presented to the United Kingdom as a whole.

 “the devolution settlements are built upon UK membership of the EU.

Brexit will remove one of the foundations of the devolution settlements, with potentially destabilising consequences”. (Para. 2)

The report considers whether Scotland could have different Brexit arrangements from the rest of the UK in some areas; the need to protect the Welsh agricultural and manufacturing sector and the distinctive geographical and political issues that Brexit presents to Northern Ireland.

The full report is available here.

 

The abolition of mobile roaming charges and Brexit

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Since 15 June 2017 roaming charges in the EU have been abolished allowing mobile customers to use their network provider’s allowance of minutes, text messages and data throughout the EU and the European Economic Area (EEA) without incurring additional charges.

The abolition of roaming charges will continue to apply in the UK until it leaves the EU.

A new House of Commons Library briefing paper, available here, looks at possible scenarios after Brexit.

The factsheets below, produced by the European Commission, explain the current pre-Brexit situation.

Roaming factsheet: TechnicalroamingfactsheetEN

Roam Like at Home FAQs: RoamLikeatHomeEN

However, as this BBC article explains, customers are still liable for extra charges if they exceed their contractually agreed data usage limits.

 

 

 

Brexit: Agriculture and trade

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The outcome of Brexit negotiations will impact on agriculture and trade in agricultural products across the UK.

A House of Commons Library paper looking at the issues is available here.

An earlier briefing paper by the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) looking at these issues in Scotland is available here.

 

Brexit and the fishing industry

Peterhead Harbour
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The implications of Brexit for the fishing industry are highly uncertain.  Prior to the introduction of a new Fisheries Bill, the House of Commons Library has produced a briefing paper entitled “Brexit: What next for UK fisheries?” on how negotiations with the EU and future UK Government policy may affect fishing in the UK.  It is available here.

An earlier briefing paper by the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) called Implications of leaving the EU: Fisheries examines issues for the Scottish sea fishing sector.  It is available here.

Scotland and Brexit

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© Jack Shainsky. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Two recent reports may be of interest:

A research paper entitled The Impact of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union on Scotland, Wales and Gibraltar  has been produced at the request of the European Parliament’s Committee on Constitutional Affairs.  It looks at the economic and political implications of Brexit  and at the possible return of  ‘Europeanised’ competencies to  devolved administrations. The paper also considers how Brexit might affect their future relationships within the UK and externally with the EU.

The Scottish Parliament’s SPICe briefing paper: The White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill – Impact on Scotland  looks at how the provisions proposed in the UK Government White Paper  “Legislating for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union” may affect Scotland.

As regular readers will know, SPICe also provides a weekly update on the current developments on the United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union.  The latest bulletin is available here.

 

 

Justice for families, individuals and businesses

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© Gerard Van der Leun. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

A report by the EU Justice Sub-Committee of the House of Lords looks at the issues arising from the UK’s decision to leave the European Union, and, in particular, remove itself from the jurisdiction of the Court of Justice of the European Union, in relation to European cross border cases in such areas as:

  • Divorce
  • Disputed custody of children
  • A medical negligence claim;
  • Litigation arising out of a car accident abroad
  • Failure to perform a contract
  • An employment dispute

The current legal framework provides certainty about where such cases should be held and  for the automatic recognition and enforcement of judicial decisions and judgments throughout the EU. The report highlights concerns for families, individuals and businesses if  alternative adequate arrangements are not in place when the UK leaves the EU.

The full report is available here:

 

 

Article 50 negotiations: Implications of ‘no deal’ – Report

Sundown

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The European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill has now completed its passage through both Houses of Parliament and, under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union, gives the Prime Minister the power to notify the European Council of the UK’s intention to withdraw from the EU.  With Article 50, likely to be triggered by the end of the month, allowing negotiations to start, this report by the Foreign Affairs Committee of the House of Commons looks at what would happen in the event of no deal being reached.

Some of the implications discussed in the report are:

  • Disputes over the cost of exiting the EU
  •  Uncertainty for EU citizens in the UK and UK citizens in the EU
  • Trading on World Trade Organisation terms
  • The ‘regulatory gap’ and the limitations of the Great Repeal Bill
  • Uncertainty for UK participation in the EU’s common foreign and security policy
  • The sudden return of a ‘hard’ customs border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland

The full report is available here

More information about the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill is available here.

 

UK trade options after Brexit

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© John Fielding. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The International Trade Committee‘s first report UK Trade Options Beyond 2019 identifies and examines possible models for  the UK to conduct international trade after it leaves the European Union. It details various options and looks at the issues the Government would need to resolve in each scenario.

Topics considered are:

  • Re-joining EFTA
  • Free Trade Agreement with the EU
  • World Trade Organization rules
  • Free Trade Agreements with the rest of the world
  • Establishing the UK’s position at the WTO

The report summary is available here.