Tag Archives: EU

Data Roaming Charges Abolished in the EU

Roaming factsheet detail
Factsheet detail © European Commission

As of today, (15th June 2017) data roaming charges for all travellers in the European Union have been abolished, as part of the wider project to create a Digital Single Market. The European Commission has produced a couple of useful factsheets (see links at bottom of article) on what this entails. However, as this BBC article explains, customers are still liable for extra charges if they exceed their contractually agreed data usage limits.

As the BBC article also points out, once article 50 has been fully implemented, it will be the up to a future UK Government to decide as to whether the UK adopts these pricing restrictions or not.

Roaming factsheet: TechnicalroamingfactsheetEN

Roam Like at Home FAQs: RoamLikeatHomeEN

 

Travelling in Europe 2017-18

Travelling in Europe
Pamphlet cover © European Commission

Travelling in Europe, a leaflet published by the EU,  has now been updated for 2017-18. It contains lots of useful, practical information about travelling in the EU and includes a fold-out map of the continent.

Topics covered include:

  • Accessing healthcare
  • Driving
  • Money
  • Passenger rights
  • Pet passports
  • Using mobile phones
  • Schengen rules
  • Shopping
  • and much more…

You can download a free copy from the EU Bookshop or come and pick one up from the EDC in Taylor Library.

 

EU Referendum campaign leaflets collection available online

yesno
© Quinn Dombrowski. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The British Library and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) Library have collected a sample of leaflets from organisations, political parties and individuals both from the “Leave” and the “Remain” side in last June’s Referendum. The collection also includes material collected by National Library of Wales.  You can view this revealing collection, via the LSE Digital Library, here.  The digital library also has leaflets from the 1975 Referendum allowing you to compare the two campaigns.

 

New independent and unaligned Edinburgh based think tank established

 

small
© Rob Watling. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The Scottish Centre on European Relations was launched last month with the stated aim:

“to inform, debate, and provide up-to-the-minute, high quality research and analysis of European Union developments and challenges”

While it focuses on pan-EU issues it has a particular focus on Scotland’s EU interests and policies.

Recent publications include:  “Scotland’s Transition to EU membership”; “What is Really Driving Populism in Europe” and  “Scotland’s Brexit Choices”

You can check out recent publications here.

 

Report: together in the EU

together-in-the-euRisk of school segregation, discrimination and restrictions to political participation can form insurmountable barriers to the integration of migrants in EU society, as a new report from the EU’s Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) shows.

It examines integration strategies across the EU, providing clear evidence of the successes and failures of current policy and recommending changes in order to build a stronger and more cohesive Europe.

An accompanying infographic illustrates some of the main issues when it comes to integrating migrants and their descendants in the EU.

16 March: Facebook live discussion with Jyrki Katainen on the future of Europe

eu_fb_live_katainen_v3

Join the Jyrki Katainen – Vice-President for Jobs, Growth, Investment & Competitiveness – for a Facebook Live discussion on Thursday 16 March at 14h CET.

“We don’t want to dictate what is the #FutureOfEurope. We have to strengthen national ownership to the EU project.” – Jyrki Katainen

Start asking your questions about the Future of Europe, the #CircularEconomy, #investEU, #EUdefence and more.

Article 50 negotiations: Implications of ‘no deal’ – Report

Sundown

© Simon & His Camera. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill has now completed its passage through both Houses of Parliament and, under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union, gives the Prime Minister the power to notify the European Council of the UK’s intention to withdraw from the EU.  With Article 50, likely to be triggered by the end of the month, allowing negotiations to start, this report by the Foreign Affairs Committee of the House of Commons looks at what would happen in the event of no deal being reached.

Some of the implications discussed in the report are:

  • Disputes over the cost of exiting the EU
  •  Uncertainty for EU citizens in the UK and UK citizens in the EU
  • Trading on World Trade Organisation terms
  • The ‘regulatory gap’ and the limitations of the Great Repeal Bill
  • Uncertainty for UK participation in the EU’s common foreign and security policy
  • The sudden return of a ‘hard’ customs border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland

The full report is available here

More information about the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill is available here.

 

UK trade options after Brexit

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© John Fielding. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The International Trade Committee‘s first report UK Trade Options Beyond 2019 identifies and examines possible models for  the UK to conduct international trade after it leaves the European Union. It details various options and looks at the issues the Government would need to resolve in each scenario.

Topics considered are:

  • Re-joining EFTA
  • Free Trade Agreement with the EU
  • World Trade Organization rules
  • Free Trade Agreements with the rest of the world
  • Establishing the UK’s position at the WTO

The report summary is available here.