Tag Archives: UK Government

Public Meeting: Brexit: What next for the UK and Scotland?

brexitstarsThis meeting presents a chance to find out more about the issues at stake and what the options are.  There will be short presentations by specialists on Europe, followed by an open discussion.

This event involving the University of the Highlands and Islands, the Centre on Constitutional Change, the European Commission Representation in Scotland & the UK in a Changing Europe will take place at the University of the Highlands and Islands, Executive Office, Ness Walk, Inverness on Wednesday 31st May 2017 – 10:30 am – 12:30pm.

More information on this free event, including how to register, is available here.

For those not able to attend there will be a video conference link available. Please contact iona.macdonald@uhi.ac.uk as soon as possible and at the very latest 48 hours before the event.

 

 

 

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Euratom

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© [IAEA Imagebank]. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

“Euratom was founded to contribute to the formation and development of Europe’s nuclear industries, to guarantee high safety standards and to prevent nuclear materials intended principally for civilian use from being diverted to military use. It provides the basis for the regulation of civilian nuclear activity, implements a system of safeguards to control the use of nuclear materials, controls the supply of fissile materials within EU member states and funds research into nuclear fission and nuclear fusion.”

The Government has stated in the Explanatory Notes, prepared by the Department for Exiting the European Union, for the European Union Notification of Withdrawal Bill that leaving the EU also means leaving the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). The House of House Library has produced a briefing paper examining what Euratom does and the possible implications of leaving for the future of the nuclear industry and nuclear research in the UK. It also looks at the attempts to amend the Bill as it relates to Euratom. You can access the briefing paper here.

 

 

Brexit: Environment and Climate Change

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© Thomas Rusling. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Earlier this week the House of Lords EU Energy and Environment Sub-Committee published its report on Brexit: environment and climate change recommending key actions to ensure the environment is as well protected post Brexit as it is now.

The report discusses how policies and standards relating  to the environment and climate change are deeply embedded in EU Law and points out the complexity and scale of the task ahead.

Aberdeen University staff and students can access the full report on Public Information Online here.

UPDATE Can the UK government launch the process to leave the EU without an Act of Parliament?

 

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© Jay Gavin Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The government’s appeal was dismissed in the Supreme Court yesterday.  This means that Parliament has to give its approval before the formal process of leaving the EU can begin. The judgement and summary documents are available here.

The original case was about prerogative powers, defined by the High Court in the original case as “the residue of legal authority left in the hands of the Crown” however as the UK has a sovereign parliament it is argued that prerogative powers cannot be used to overrule legislation. The government argued, however, that it did have the prerogative power to “make and unmake treaties” allowing it to launch the process without requiring an Act of Parliament.

The Scottish Government was also involved in this case. The Lord Advocate’s intervention proposed that triggering article 50 required an Act of the UK Parliament and as a result also required a Legislative Consent Motion of the Scottish Parliament, under the Sewel Convention, given the effect it would have on matters devolved to the Scottish Parliament.  However, in regards to the Sewel Convention the Supreme Court has ruled that the policing of its scope and the manner of its operation does not lie within the constitutional remit of the judiciary. This means the Scottish Parliament, as with the other devolved administrations, cannot veto the triggering of Article 50.

 

Can the UK government launch the process to leave the EU without an Act of Parliament?

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© Jay Gavin Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

This is what the Supreme Court will be considering today in a case expected to last 4 days.  Follow it live here.

The case is about prerogative powers, defined by the High Court in the original case as “the residue of legal authority left in the hands of the Crown” however as the UK has a sovereign parliament it is argued that prerogative powers cannot be used to overrule legislation. The government argues, however, in does have the prerogative power to “make and unmake treaties” allowing it to launch the process without requiring an Act of Parliament.

The Scottish Government is also involved in this case. The Lord Advocate’s intervention proposes that triggering article 50 requires an Act of the UK Parliament and as a result requires a Legislative Consent Motion of the Scottish Parliament as matters devolved to them are involved.

SPICe blog: UK decision to leave the European Union hub

Theresa May Visits Scotland

© Crown Copyright. Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) produces research briefings on a wide range of issues. Intended to assist MSPs in their parliamentary work by providing relevant up-to-date impartial background material the briefing papers are useful to anyone starting to research a current issue.

SPICe also produce a blog which has a section devoted to the UK decision to leave the European Union. A particularly useful feature is the weekly update on current developments following on from the decision to leave.